FAQ’s

Have a question? Check our Frequently Asked Questions page for answers.

About Us (12)

You can check our website for updates or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Category: About Us

We can be reached during work hours at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606. You can also complete an online service request form here.

Category: About Us

The office is located at 1737 W Houston Ave, Visalia, CA. 

Category: About Us

Regular work hours are Monday through Friday from 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM.

Category: About Us

You can complete an online form here or call our office during work hours at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606.

Category: About Us

Nothing. No representative of Delta Vector Control District will ever ask you to pay for services.

Category: About Us

You can view a map of the District here or call our office during work hours at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606.

Category: About Us

Delta Vector Control District serves most of northern Tulare County including Cutler, Dinuba, Exeter, Farmersville, Goshen, Ivanhoe, Orosi, Traver, Woodlake, most of Visalia, and the unincorporated areas between these cities. You can see our District map here.

Category: About Us

Mosquitoes are the deadliest animal on planet Earth. According to the World Health Organization, about 725,000 people around the world are killed every year by mosquito-borne diseases. Every year, residents across the United States are infected with mosquito-borne pathogens like West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, Eastern equine encephalitis virus, dengue virus and others. In 2019, 184 California residents were infected with West Nile virus. There are no cures for mosquito-borne diseases and only Yellow Fever has a vaccine. Mosquito control is the only way to prevent these deadly diseases.

Category: About Us

We protect District residents from mosquito-borne diseases like West Nile virus and mosquito nuisances. Key activities include mosquito surveillance, disease testing, integrated vector management, and community outreach.

Category: About Us

Special districts are local government agencies that provide essential, focused services to meet the community’s needs. They are formed and governed by local residents to establish or enhance essential services and infrastructure.

Category: About Us

Delta Vector Control District, founded in 1922, is a special district charged with protecting District residents from mosquito-borne disease and nuisance mosquitoes. Learn more by visiting our About Us page.

Category: About Us

Door Hangers (7)

You do not need to do anything at this time. This is a notice that mosquito trapping has resumed for the year, and you, or someone at your residence, has given permission for your front yard to host a weekly trap. If you are no longer interested in being a trap host or have additional questions, you can contact the lab during regular business hours, by calling 559-732-8606 extension 111 or toll-free 877-732-8606 extension 111.

 

Category: Door Hangers

You need to schedule a yard inspection for potential mosquito sources. You can schedule a yard inspection during regular business hours at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606. If you have already scheduled an inspection, please disregard the final notice. If your property has already been inspected, you may need to schedule a re-inspection if mosquito sources were found. Please check your copy of the inspection form for the return date. This service is free. You received a final notice in the mail because you were not present when technicians first tried to make contact at the property and you have not scheduled an inspection at the time the letter was sent.

 

Category: Door Hangers

You do not need to do anything at this time. Technicians have inspected for and/or treated mosquito sources in your front/back yard. Technicians may need to return at a later date to follow up on the mosquito sources. If you would like more information about what technicians found, how to prevent future breeding, or to schedule a reinspection, call 559-732-8606 or toll-free 877-732-8606 during regular business hours. This service is free.

 

Category: Door Hangers

You need to schedule a yard inspection for potential mosquito sources within 3 business days. You can schedule a yard inspection during regular business hours at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606. You may also schedule online via our Blue Door Hanger Response Form. You received this notice because your property is located in a high risk area for invasive Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. This service is free.

 

Category: Door Hangers

Check your own yard for common water sources listed on the door hanger and dump them weekly or eliminate the water sources completely when possible. These door hangers mean that the invasive Aedes aegypti mosquito has been found in your area. You do not need to contact the District at this time but, in the future, we may need to inspect your front and backyard for potential sources. Learn what mosquito sources to look for here or fill out an online service request form to request a technician’s help here.

Category: Door Hangers

You need to schedule a yard inspection for potential mosquito sources. You can schedule a yard inspection during regular business hours at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606. This service is free.

 

Category: Door Hangers

Door hangers are left for a variety of reasons including the need to schedule an inspection/treatment, notification of an inspection, request to set a mosquito trap, and education. Each door hanger has a different color scheme based on how the resident needs to respond. All services are free. Continue reading below to find out more.

Category: Door Hangers

Invasive Mosquito Species (4)

Once infected, Aedes aegypti are capable of transmitting zika, dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever virus through their bite.

Aedes aegypti mosquitoes prefer to stay in urban areas where they have easy access to their preferred food source (humans) and to standing water in man-made containers.

Currently, the only invasive mosquito in the District is Aedes aegypti, also known as the yellow fever mosquito. For more information, please visit our vector page.

An invasive mosquito species is one that has been introduced to the region recently.

Mosquito Sources (11)

Pet water bowls should be washed every three days to remove potential mosquito eggs. If you have an automatic pet watering bowl, the automatic feature must also be cleaned. On the other hand, mosquitofish can be placed in troughs to prevent mosquitoes from breeding. If you would like mosquitofish, contact our office at 559-732-8606 or through the toll-free number 877-732-8606 during regular business hours.

Empty and clean by scrubbing birdbaths at least every three days. Chlorinating birdbaths can also help prevent mosquito breeding. Invasive Aedes mosquitoes can lay their eggs on the sides of the water in the birdbath and can remain dry, and viable, for up to a year. See Invasive Mosquito Species for more information about the invasive Aedes mosquitoes.

Properly maintaining and running the fountain will maintain a constant flow of water and prevent mosquitoes from breeding. Additionally, chlorinating, or using bleach, on the fountain will prevent mosquito breeding. The District also offers free mosquitofish for larger fountains. If you would like mosquitofish, contact our office at 559-732-8606 or through the toll-free number 877-732-8606 during regular business hours.

Fish and turtles are common types of animals that feed on mosquito larvae. Both small fish and small turtles will feed on mosquito larvae until they reach a certain size where they prefer to eat larger meals. However, mosquitofish will always eat any mosquito larvae because they will not grow more than about 3 inches. The District provides free mosquitofish for ponds, horse troughs, large fountains, and other water sources. If you would like mosquitofish, contact our office at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606 during regular business hours. Since mosquitoes breed in stagnant water, maintaining a constant flow of water in the pond reduces mosquito breeding.

You can anonymously report potential mosquito sources using our online service request form, or call during regular office hours. We will not share your information.

There are several options available depending on the source. The District provides free mosquitofish for larger water sources like ponds, water troughs, and large fountains. Maintaining appropriate chlorination of swimming pools, hot tubs, fountains, and birdbaths will also prevent mosquito breeding.

Potential mosquito sources should be dumped at least once a week.

Mosquitoes need to lay their eggs on water or at the waterlines of standing water. Without standing water, mosquitoes cannot lay their eggs and the eggs cannot develop into adult mosquitoes. No standing water means no mosquitoes.

Most mosquitoes can develop from an egg to an adult in as little as 5-7 days. Some species can develop even quicker. Warmer weather shortens this time frame while colder temperatures increase it.

Mosquitoes can develop in water sources as small as a bottle cap or as large as a marsh. Different mosquito species prefers different water sources.

A mosquito source, also known as breeding source, is water where mosquito eggs, larvae, and pupae live and develop into adults. Any water source that lasts for 3 or more days is a potential mosquito source.

Mosquito Trap Hosts (8)

You may contact the District during regular business hours at 559-732-8606 extension 111. We would like to thank you for your service to the community and your contribution to keeping District residents free from nuisance mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases.

 

All mosquitoes are counted and identified to species. These mosquitoes are also tested for viruses if there are at least 10 female mosquitoes of a species that is capable of transmitting West Nile Virus, St. Louis Encephalitis virus, or Western Equine Encephalitis virus.

No. Traps will collect mosquitoes from the general area. Depending on the mosquito species, they may be coming from a water source that is very close to the trap or one that is farther away. If you are concerned about potential sources in your yard, you can visit our prevention page for tips on what to look for, or use our online service request form or at 559-732-8606 for a free yard inspection.

You do not have to do anything to be a trap host. A technician will drop the trap off early in the morning once a week and pick it up the next day. Our goal with trap placement and pick up is to avoid disturbing the resident or interfering with their regular activities as much as possible.

No. Mosquito traps catch mosquitoes that are already in the general area of the trap.

 

Roughly 5 routine traps are placed per square mile of populated area. Trap hosts are selected to evenly spread these traps across this area. In general, technicians look for properties that have shaded areas such as bushes where a trap can be placed over night without being disturbed.

Mosquito traps provide routine surveillance data about the size of the mosquito population in that area and the presence of mosquito-borne diseases. This information is used by Delta Vector Control District to find and control existing mosquito sources in the area as well as to monitor ongoing control efforts. Visit our Programs & Services page for more information about vector surveillance.

A trap host is a property where a trap is placed once a week for an entire mosquito season (typically April to mid-October) or for a single night during the year. Residents voluntarily give permission for these traps to be placed on their property and play a crucial role in protecting their communities from mosquito-borne diseases.

Mosquito-Borne Diseases (4)

Mosquitoes can transmit pathogens to pets and animals. The three mosquito-borne diseases found in our district, West Nile, St. Louis encephalitis, and Western equine encephalitis viruses, primarily circulate in birds. West Nile Virus and Western equine encephalitis virus can be transmitted to horses. However, there is a West Nile and Western equine encephalitis virus vaccine available for horses. Additionally, dogs can also be infected with dog heartworm, a mosquito-borne parasite.

The District tests mosquitoes collected within the District border using RNA extraction and reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

West Nile virus and St. Louis encephalitis virus have been detected in the District every year. Currently, the District tests mosquitoes for West Nile, St. Louis Encephalitis, and Western Equine Encephalitis viruses.

Mosquito-borne diseases are diseases caused by pathogens that are spread through the bite of an infected mosquito. These include malaria, yellow fever, Zika, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, Western equine encephalitis virus, dengue, chikungunya, dog heartworm, and many more.

Native Mosquito Species (3)

All mosquito species need water to develop into adults. The preferred water source can vary widely from seemingly clean water to foul, stagnant water. The size of the water source can also vary, from small puddles to green swimming pools and ponds. For more detailed information, please visit our vector page.

Within the District, three Culex mosquito species are capable of transmitting West Nile virus, St. Louis Encephalitis virus, and Western Equine Encephalitis virus.

There are about 14 native mosquito species within the District that are considered to be of public health concern because of their nuisance biting or potential to transmit pathogens through their bite. To learn more about mosquitoes and the species found in the District, visit our vector page.

Other Vectors (5)

You can contact the District during regular hours at 559-732-8606 or toll-free at 877-732-8606 for more information.

Category: Other Vectors

Within California, fleas have been known to transmit murine typhus and plague.

Category: Other Vectors

Within California, ticks have been known to transmit Lyme disease, tularemia, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, 364D rickettsiosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, and tick paralysis.

Category: Other Vectors

In our District, mosquitoes are the primary vectors of public health concern because an infected mosquito can transmit West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, or Western Equine Encephalitis virus through their bite. Other vectors, such as ticks are capable of transmitting pathogens but these diseases are relatively rare.

Category: Other Vectors

A vector is any animal or insect that is capable of transmitting pathogens to people or harming them. Common vectors around the world are rodents, mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas. In our District, mosquitoes are the primary vectors of public health concern.

Category: Other Vectors

Preventing Mosquito Bites (4)

Mosquitoes can follow you into your home or enter through unscreened doors and windows that have been left open or are opened frequently. Screening your doors and windows is a great solution to prevent mosquitoes from entering homes. Regularly check your screens to make sure they fit tightly into the window or door frame and that there are no holes. Also, make sure you do not have standing water inside your homes. Vases, plant trays, and unused bathrooms are potential breeding sources for the invasive Aedes mosquitoes. See Mosquito Sources for more details about mosquito sources and how to properly manage them.

 

Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered repellents and wear loose long-sleeved shirts, and pants that are light-colored. When using, or purchasing, EPA-registered repellents, look for the active ingredients DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE), or para-menthane-diol (PMD). Look for these active ingredients at 20% or above. Click here for more information about EPA-registered repellents.

Mosquitoes rely on a combination of stimuli in order to seek their hosts: carbon dioxide, temperature, moisture, odor, color, and movement. In this case, mosquitoes can be attracted to humans because we produce carbon dioxide when we breathe and also release chemical signals to mosquitoes when we sweat.

 

Only female mosquitoes bite. Female mosquitoes bite humans and other animals to get a blood meal. They need protein from the blood to make their eggs.

 

Traveling (6)

Contact your physician and local public health department as soon as possible. Prevent mosquito bites by wearing loose, light-colored, long-sleeve shirts and pants and using an EPA-registered insect repellent and reapplying as directed on the product label. Prevent mosquitoes from entering your house by ensuring that all your windows and doors have screens in good condition and by running your air conditioning.

Category: Traveling

Bring an EPA-registered insect repellent with the active ingredients DEET, picaridin, ID3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or para-menthane-diol at 20% or above. These repellents come in sprays, wipes, and lotions can easily be transported in your luggage. Consider sleeping under a mosquito net depending on the country you are visiting. Consult with the appropriate travel agency for specific information about what you can bring into the transporting vehicle.

Category: Traveling

Currently, only malaria can be prevented by taking a prescription medicine before, during, and after your trip to an at-risk area.  Check the Center for Disease Control Travelers’ Health for recommended preventative treatments and consult with a travel health practitioner at least 3 months before your scheduled departure.

Category: Traveling

Currently, only Yellow Fever and Japanese Encephalitis virus are preventable with an immunization. Check the Center for Disease Control Travelers’ Health for recommended immunizations and consult with a travel health practitioner at least 3 months before your scheduled departure.

Category: Traveling

No! Mosquitoes, ticks, and other vectors are common throughout the USA and its territories. Prevent insect bites anytime you travel by using an EPA-registered insect repellent.

Category: Traveling

Check your destination for health risks at the Center for Disease Control Travelers’ Health website and consult with a travel health practitioner to ensure you receive the appropriate immunizations, preventative treatments, and resources you need for a safe trip. Start planning at least 3 months in advance to ensure that you have time to complete all travel requirements and recommendations.

Category: Traveling

Load More